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Thursday, 06 February 2014 13:31

The Australian Financial Review

One of Australia's most influential economists.

Thursday, 06 February 2014 13:30

Alan Kohler, Author and ABC TV journalist

One of the most articulate economists in Australia.

Thursday, 06 February 2014 13:29

The Australian Financial Review.

The Prime Minister's Office has placed a premium on economic and policy advice recruiting high-profile market economist, Stephen Koukoulas.

Thursday, 06 February 2014 13:27

Head of Communications Randstad

I've only heard great things about your presentation at the breakfast.

Thursday, 06 February 2014 13:24

Head of communication - Randstad

I've only heard great things about your presentation at the breakfast – so thank you. Clients and staff all raved about you – how engaging, thought provoking and entertaining you were. You made the content come alive.

Wednesday, 05 February 2014 23:02

Aussie dollar outlook

In this video The Kouk discuss the state of global financial markets and the outlook for the Aussie dollar with ABC News.

Wednesday, 05 February 2014 22:34

Why Australia won't face a recession

Speaking at the GRDC's Bendigo Farm Business Update, The Kouk discusses the outlook for agriculture.

Wednesday, 05 February 2014 22:30

Optimism for 2014 in the business sector

Stephen speaks to ABC news hosts regarding the newfound optimisim by Australian businesses for the coming year.

Wednesday, 05 February 2014 22:05

Forget debt!

The Kouk and Judith Sloan debating the impact of household debt on Australians at the Festival of Dangerous Ideas 2013.

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THE LATEST FROM THE KOUK

“Bitterly disappointing”: We are seeing a once in a generation policy failure

Thu, 12 Sep 2019

This article first appeared on the Yahoo Finance website at this link: https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/rba-interest-rates-government-can-stimulate-economy-but-wont-210050650.html 

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“Bitterly disappointing”: We are seeing a once in a generation policy failure

Imagine having the power to promote economic growth, lower the unemployment rate and set in train the conditions to boost real wages growth and inflation?

It would be immensely satisfying to change policies to improve the living standards and quality of life for every day, hard-working Australians and their families.

Wouldn’t it?

Next imagine a harsh reality where economic growth is weak and slowing, the unemployment rate is rising and wages growth and inflation well below a satisfactory level, and you choose not to wield the power reverse these uncomfortable circumstances?

Doing nothing, unwilling to pump some much needed cash into the economy because of a political dogma wedded to a notion that budget surpluses are good and that holding interest rates unnecessarily high so you might dampen demand for houses – which is seen as a problem - and household debt overwhelms your power to make things better.

The RBA admits it stuffed things up – sort of

Mon, 22 Jul 2019

This article first appeared on the Yahoo website at this link: https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/did-the-rb-as-monetary-policy-put-our-economy-at-risk-033940907.html

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The RBA admits it stuffed things up – sort of

The Reserve Bank of Australia needs to be congratulated for publishing research which implicitly confirms that it made a mistake when setting monetary policy in the period mid-2017 to early 2019.

Not that the research explicitly says that, but the RBA Discussion Paper, Cost-benefit Analysis of Leaning Against the Wind, written by Trent Saunders and Peter Tulip, makes the powerful conclusion that by keeping monetary policy tighter in order to “lean against” the risk of a financial crisis, there was a cost to the economy that is three to eight times larger than the benefit of minimising the risk of such a crisis eventuating.

The costs to the economy includes lower GDP growth and higher unemployment, that lasts for at least for several years.

A few terms first.

According to the Saunders/Tulip research, “leaning against the wind”, a term widely used in central banking, is “the policy of setting interest rates higher than a narrow interpretation of a central bank’s macroeconomic objectives would warrant due to concerns about financial instability”. In the RBA’s case, the “narrow interpretation” of the RBA’s objectives are the 2 to 3 per cent inflation target and full employment.

In the context of the period since 2017 and despite the RBA consistently undershooting its inflation target and with labour underutilisation significantly above the level consistent with full employment, the RBA steadfastly refused to ease monetary policy (cut official interest rates) because it considered higher interest rate settings were appropriate to “lean against” house price growth and elevated levels of household debt.