Blog

Tue, 23 Jan 2018  |  

This article first appeared on the Yahoo 7 Finance website at this link: https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/2332204-002854969.html 

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'Disconcerting': 5 reasons why interest rates wont rise

Interest rates are about to rise.

So say a growing number of economists and the money market futures which are now pricing in a 25 basis point interest rate rise in the final quarter of 2018 and a further 25 basis point rise in the second quarter of 2019.

The market and many economists are increasingly optimistic that economic growth, wages and inflation will all of a sudden lift back to levels consistent with a healthy economy. The theory is that as a result of this good economic news, the hand of the RBA will be forced to hike rates from what are currently record lows. To be sure, these interest rate rises could happen over that time frame. It would be a most welcome development to see interest rates move higher as it would be a sign of a return to favourable economic conditions for the first time in many years.

But just how reliable are the forecasts and the market pricing?

Mon, 22 Jan 2018  |  

This article first appeared on the Yahoo7 Finance website at this link: https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/2307140-040859645.html 

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Get ready for election economics

Let’s get a bit of basic economics and budget analysis sorted out as 2018, a likely year for the next Federal election, starts to unfold.

Tax cuts do stimulate economic growth.

Be it company or income taxes that are cut, the impact on economic growth will be positive, at least in the short run. When the government decides to cut taxes by, say, $1 billion a year, there is a simple transfer of $1 billion cash from the government sector with its saving level reduced by that amount, to the private sector. That $1 billion will be available to be spent, invested or even saved by the private sector. Whatever the end mix, there is a boost to the economy.

And yes, it is as simple as that.

But what if the government decides to spend $1 billion extra on educational, roads, consultants, health care, or any other purpose for that matter?

Well, that would stimulate the economy too. The effect would be different to a tax cut because the money would be directed to a specific area (consultants for example) and not as broadly based as a tax cut. But in the end, $1 billion of cash is simply transferred from the government into the bank accounts of those receiving the money via the extra spending.

Again, it is that simple.

Fri, 19 Jan 2018  |  

The recent house price data from Corelogic are showing further falls in house prices.

The falls are, disconcertingly, most evident in Sydney where prices have dropped 0.5 per cent so far in January, which brings the aggregate fall since the September 2017 peak to a chunky 2.9 per cent. This means that for a $1 million property in September, the value has fallen $29,000 in just 4 months.

The house price weakness is not confined to Sydney.

In Melbourne, the Corelogic data shows house prices topping-out. Prices are down 0.3 per cent from the December 2017 peak which, to be sure, is not a large decline after the stunning increases of previous years, but a fall it is.

Thu, 18 Jan 2018  |  

There was another round of euphoria as the monthly labour force data hit the screens. The data showed a nice 34,700 rise in employment in December which brought the total rise in jobs in 2017 to 403,100.

This is good news, to be sure, but how good is it really? What is the context for this increase in employment and how is Australia going in an ever vibrant and dynamic global economy?

Of some concern, Australia’s unemployment rate remains at 5.5 per cent – it actually ticked up from 5.4 per cent the prior month. Interestingly, and something less favourable, is the fact that the unemployment rate has been below 5.5 per cent for just two months (October and November 2017) in the last four and half years. Where is that 5 per cent or lower full-employment target everyone reckons we are near?

What’s more interesting, and a sign of the policy sloth that Australia is enduring at the moment, is that around the world, unemployment rates are falling and are impressively low.

Sure each country will have its quirks but have a look at our 5.5 per cent against these countries.

Tue, 16 Jan 2018  |  

This article first appeared on the Dynamic Syndications website at this link: https://www.dynamicsyndications.com/news/Racehorse-Ownership-Sets-Record-High 

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Racehorse Ownership Sets Record High

 Fantastic news in the racing industry.

Race horse ownership hit a record high in 2016-17, with Syndications giving an increasing number of people access to a share in a racing thoroughbred.

In 2016-17, there were 79,631 owners of a race horse or a share in a race horse. This is up 0.9 per cent from the number a year earlier and up a healthy 16.8 per cent from the level 5 years earlier in 2011-12.

The nature of horse ownership is changing. The number of registered horses to have 10 or more owners rose to a record high of 1,736 which represented 15.3 per cent of all registered horses. Just think of it, one in seven horses running around Australia’s race tracks is owned by 10 or more people. Back in 2005-06, there were only 659 horses with 10 or more owners, which was just 4.8 per cent of all registered owners.

Thu, 11 Jan 2018  |  

Every man, woman and their dog was blown away with the massive 1.2 per cent rise in Australian retail sales in November. It was enough to spark a sell-off in the bond market and a jump in the Aussie dollar.

The ABS noted in the release that the surge was influenced by the release of the iPhoneX which at around $1,500 a pop, was a big enough issue to mention.

Of course, the iPhoneX was released around the world at the same time in November which prompted me to have a look at the retail sales results in other parts of the world – to see if the iPhone effect was important elsewhere or just confined to Australia.

And guess what?

Wed, 10 Jan 2018  |  

The illion (formerly Dun & Bradstreet) Business Expectations Survey presented an confident outlook for the economy as 2018 kicked off.

According to the survey, a resilient Construction sector and resurgent Manufacturing industry have the most confident outlook for the first quarter of 2018, according to illion’s latest Business Expectations Survey. Driven by strong expectations for profits, selling prices, capital investment and employment, both sectors topped the final indices for the March quarter, with manufacturing confidence at its highest level since June 2003.

2018 is starting on a positive note for the economy with both business expectations and the actual performance of the business sector at multi-year highs. It would appear that the positive tone from a stronger global economy, together with low interest rates and a competitive level for the Australia dollar are all providing a tail wind for the business sector.

The full survey is available at this link: https://dnb.com.au/_media/documents/Business_Expectations_Q12018_Final.pdf 

 

 

Tue, 09 Jan 2018  |  

This article first appeared on the Yahoo 7 Finance website at this link: https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/2272401-034728405.html 

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Australia has a trade problem

Australia’s international trade position is getting markedly worse.

The bad news is that exports are falling, despite a strong global economy and some strength in commodity prices. At the same time, imports have picked up partly because of the overvalued level of the Australian dollar and partly because of an increase in capital goods imports which are picking up in line with the improvement in business investment.

In November, Australia registered a monthly deficit of $628 million on trade in goods and services which was the second deficit in a row and it sits in stark contrast to the monthly trade surpluses around $3 billion in late 2016 and early 2017. The weakness in exports is surprising. The world economy is strong with growth getting close to the best in a decade. Commodity prices are rising in line with the global strength which should be adding significantly to our export receipts. The fact that exports have been falling for nine straight months in trend terms is probably best explained by the strength of the Australian dollar which is more than offsetting the positive influences. The strong Aussie dollar, it should be noted, is being held up by Australia’s relatively high interest rates.

In the 34 years since the Australian dollar was floated, there have been numerous examples of how a high (overvalued) Australian dollar has eroded the international competitiveness of the export sector.

Mon, 08 Jan 2018  |  

Eight days into 2018 and the Corelogic price series shows that Sydney house prices have edged a further 0.1 per cent lower since 31 December 2017.

Not a large fall, to be sure, but it builds on the falls in Sydney house prices recorded in October, November and December. It is signaling the impact of the quadrella of headwinds in the form of new supply, tighter lending rules, rising interest rates for investors and better investment opportunities in other asset classes.

From the peak in early September 2017, Sydney house prices have fallen by 2.5 per cent. That’s about $25,000 on a $1,000,000 property.

The price decline, to date, has been orderly and still small in the context of house prices doubling over the previous decade. But it does mean that some of the powerful wealth effects that helped to fuel the New South Wales economy will be missing in 2018, and perhaps beyond. If the falls become more acute, there could be some spill-over problems to the broader economy.

Fri, 05 Jan 2018  |  

The betting markets are fielding on the next Federal election and at the moment, the punters are saying Australians are set to elect the Labor Party to office.

There are several bookies offering odds and the best odds available are $1.62 for Labor and $2.60 for the Coalition. Allowing for the bookies margins, the probabilities are approximately 65 per cent chance of a Labor win and about a 35 per cent change of a Coalition win. This means Labor are a 2 in 3 chance of winning, with the Coalition a 1 in 3 chance. Enough of the lesson of odds.

Betting markets are not particularly reliable when elections are 6 to 12 months away. But the close the election is, the more accurate they become. Recent high profile exceptions were Brexit and Trump, but even there, the odds of both of those results was no wider than $5 a week or two from polling day.

THE LATEST FROM THE KOUK

Don’t fall for the spin - Scott Morrison’s budget surplus is no certainty

Thu, 06 Dec 2018

This article first appeared on the Yahoo Finance web site at this link: https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/dont-fall-spin-scott-morrisons-budget-surplus-no-certainty-224422761.html 

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Don’t fall for the spin - Scott Morrison’s budget surplus is no certainty

Prime Minister Scott Morrison could yet be guilty of prematurely declaring that his government will deliver a budget surplus in 2018-19.

Sure, tax revenue is growing at a rapid pace and the government is underspending on a range of government services, but there are still seven long months to go between now and the end of the financial year that might yet blow up the surplus commitment.

PM Morrison’s ‘return to surplus’ boast is based, it appears, on hard data for the first four months of the 2018-19 financial year on revenue and spending information from the Department of Finance. These numbers do look strong, at least in terms of the budget numbers and if the trends on revenue and spending continue, the budget will probably be in surplus. Treasury will be factoring in ongoing economic growth, no increase in the unemployment rate and buoyant iron ore and coal prices over the remainder of the financial year. These forecasts and hence the budget bottom line are subject to a good deal of uncertainty, as they are every year.

If, as is distinctly possible, the economy stalls in the March and June quarters 2019, commodity prices continue to weaken and if there are some unexpected increases in government spending, the current erroneous forecasts for revenue and spending could leave the budget in deficit.

Change of view on monetary policy

Wed, 05 Dec 2018

In the wake of the September quarter national accounts, and with accumulating information on house prices, dwelling investment, the global economy and spare capacity in the labour market, I have revised my outlook for official interest rates.

For some time, I have been expecting the RBA to cut the official cash rate to 1.0 per cent, a forecast that has been wrong (clearly) given its decision to leave rates steady right through 2018.

That said, it has been a highly profitable call with the market pricing interest rate hikes when the call was made which has yielded a decent return as time has passed.

My updated profile for RBA rates is:

May 2019 – 25bp cut to 1.25%
August 2019 – 25bp cut to 1.00%
November 2019 – 25bp cut to 0.75%

The risk is for rates to 0.5% in very late 2019 or in 2020

It will be driven by:

  • Underlying inflation remaining below 2%
  • GDP growth around 0.25 to 0.5% per quarter in 2019
  • Annual wages growth stuck at 2.5% or less
  • Global growth slowing towards 3%
  • Labour market under-utilisation around 13 to 13.5%

There are likely to be other influences, but these are the main ones.

AUD, as a result, looks set to drop to 0.6000 – 0.6500 range.